healthfitnessfoodhumour:

It can get pretty confusing with all the different information out there about nutrition which is why the guys at Women’s Health  asked several nutritionists to set the record straight on some of the biggest healthy-eating myths around. 
Myth: Frozen Fruits and Veggies Are Less Nutritious Than Fresh Ones
"Frozen fruits and vegetables are flash-frozen within hours of being picked, locking in a majority of the nutrients," says Joy Bauer, M.S., R.D., the nutrition and health expert for NBC’s TODAY Show and founder of NourishSnacks. She recommends taking advantage of fresh produce when you can—but keeping a stash of frozen produce on-hand for times when you’re in a rush or you can’t buy that item fresh because it’s not in-season.
Myth: You Need to Cleanse or Detox
"The body already does that for you," says Kristin Kirkpatrick, M.S., R.D., a wellness manager at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute. "You don’t need a buy a juice or pill to accomplish that."
Myth: You Have to Count Calories to Lose Weight
"Consuming 100 calories’ worth of cupcakes, soda, or French fries is not the same as eating 100 calories of vegetables or brown rice," says Keri Glassman, R.D., a Women’s Healthcontributor. "I tell clients to stop getting caught up in the number of calories and instead focus on where you are getting them from." If you’re mindful and consume the vitamins and minerals your body needs, you’ll be able to drop pounds without becoming obsessive about calorie counting. AMEN TO THIS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Myth: One Type of Diet is Better Than Others
"The reality is we’re all individuals with unique needs, likes/dislikes, and intolerances," says Katie Cavuto, M.S., R.D., the dietician for the Phillies and the Flyers. "We have to take time to listen to our bodies’ needs to truly determine what works for each of us."
Myth: Eating Fat will Make You Fat
"According to abundant amounts of research, the opposite is true," says Kirkpatrick. Granted, what kind of fat you’re eating makes a big difference. "Opt for healthy fats that promote cardiovascular health—monounsaturated and essential fatty acids," suggests Glassman. Find out how much of each type of fat you should be consuming.
Myth: A Juice Cleanse is a Great Way to Jumpstart Your Metabolism
"While juicing is great because you’re getting a lot of vitamins and minerals, most commercial juices are void of protein," says Bauer. "You need protein to rev your metabolism and help steady blood sugar." If you really love to juice, only do it for one meal a day—and make sure to add a scoop of Greek yogurt or protein powder to your drink. And if you don’t love following a liquid diet, definitely don’t feel like you have to juice.
Myth: Eggs are bad for you
"I have so many clients come to me who are egg-phobic," says Brooke Alpert, M.S., R.D., founder of B Nutritious. In reality, eggs are packed with nutrients; there are six grams of protein and five grams of fat in each one. "The combination of fat and protein promotes satiety,” says Michelle Davenport, Ph.D., R.D., a Silicon Valley nutritionist. And definitely don’t discard the yolk. "It’s full of essential fatty acids like DHA (for healthy brains!) and arachidonic acid," says Davenport.
Myth: Eating After 6 p.m. Causes Weight Gain
"It doesn’t matter how late you eat, but rather what you eat," say Keri Gans, R.D., author of The Small Change Diet. “If you eat more calories than your body needs, you will gain weight—even if dinner was at 5 p.m. The problem is, most people who eat late at night are starved and wind up overeating.”
Myth: It’s Important to Eat Several Small Meals Each Day
Mitzi Dulan, R.D., author of The Pinterest Diet, recommends sticking with three meals per day and one snack. Why? “Eating five to six small meals can lead to unsatisfying meals,” she says. Also, when it feels like you never stop eating; it’s easy to take in too many calories.
Myth: Low- or No-Carb Diets Are Good for You
"Your brain needs carbs to function," says Glassman. Granted, your brain doesn’t need refined carbs like white bread, pasta, candy, and cookies. The best sources of healthy carbohydrates are whole grains, veggies, and fruits. "What matters is where you get your carbs from," says Glassman. (Source - Women’s Health)
 

healthfitnessfoodhumour:

It can get pretty confusing with all the different information out there about nutrition which is why the guys at Women’s Health  asked several nutritionists to set the record straight on some of the biggest healthy-eating myths around.

Myth: Frozen Fruits and Veggies Are Less Nutritious Than Fresh Ones

"Frozen fruits and vegetables are flash-frozen within hours of being picked, locking in a majority of the nutrients," says Joy Bauer, M.S., R.D., the nutrition and health expert for NBC’s TODAY Show and founder of NourishSnacks. She recommends taking advantage of fresh produce when you can—but keeping a stash of frozen produce on-hand for times when you’re in a rush or you can’t buy that item fresh because it’s not in-season.

Myth: You Need to Cleanse or Detox

"The body already does that for you," says Kristin Kirkpatrick, M.S., R.D., a wellness manager at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute. "You don’t need a buy a juice or pill to accomplish that."

Myth: You Have to Count Calories to Lose Weight

"Consuming 100 calories’ worth of cupcakes, soda, or French fries is not the same as eating 100 calories of vegetables or brown rice," says Keri Glassman, R.D., a Women’s Healthcontributor. "I tell clients to stop getting caught up in the number of calories and instead focus on where you are getting them from." If you’re mindful and consume the vitamins and minerals your body needs, you’ll be able to drop pounds without becoming obsessive about calorie counting. AMEN TO THIS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Myth: One Type of Diet is Better Than Others

"The reality is we’re all individuals with unique needs, likes/dislikes, and intolerances," says Katie Cavuto, M.S., R.D., the dietician for the Phillies and the Flyers. "We have to take time to listen to our bodies’ needs to truly determine what works for each of us."

Myth: Eating Fat will Make You Fat

"According to abundant amounts of research, the opposite is true," says Kirkpatrick. Granted, what kind of fat you’re eating makes a big difference. "Opt for healthy fats that promote cardiovascular health—monounsaturated and essential fatty acids," suggests Glassman. Find out how much of each type of fat you should be consuming.

Myth: A Juice Cleanse is a Great Way to Jumpstart Your Metabolism

"While juicing is great because you’re getting a lot of vitamins and minerals, most commercial juices are void of protein," says Bauer. "You need protein to rev your metabolism and help steady blood sugar." If you really love to juice, only do it for one meal a day—and make sure to add a scoop of Greek yogurt or protein powder to your drink. And if you don’t love following a liquid diet, definitely don’t feel like you have to juice.

Myth: Eggs are bad for you

"I have so many clients come to me who are egg-phobic," says Brooke Alpert, M.S., R.D., founder of B Nutritious. In reality, eggs are packed with nutrients; there are six grams of protein and five grams of fat in each one. "The combination of fat and protein promotes satiety,” says Michelle Davenport, Ph.D., R.D., a Silicon Valley nutritionist. And definitely don’t discard the yolk. "It’s full of essential fatty acids like DHA (for healthy brains!) and arachidonic acid," says Davenport.

Myth: Eating After 6 p.m. Causes Weight Gain

"It doesn’t matter how late you eat, but rather what you eat," say Keri Gans, R.D., author of The Small Change Diet. “If you eat more calories than your body needs, you will gain weight—even if dinner was at 5 p.m. The problem is, most people who eat late at night are starved and wind up overeating.”

Myth: It’s Important to Eat Several Small Meals Each Day

Mitzi Dulan, R.D., author of The Pinterest Diet, recommends sticking with three meals per day and one snack. Why? “Eating five to six small meals can lead to unsatisfying meals,” she says. Also, when it feels like you never stop eating; it’s easy to take in too many calories.

Myth: Low- or No-Carb Diets Are Good for You

"Your brain needs carbs to function," says Glassman. Granted, your brain doesn’t need refined carbs like white bread, pasta, candy, and cookies. The best sources of healthy carbohydrates are whole grains, veggies, and fruits. "What matters is where you get your carbs from," says Glassman. (Source - Women’s Health)

 

(Source: healthfitnesshumour, via findinghealthyhappiness)

1,977 notes

(Source: mentalhealthresource)

56 notes

scienceshenanigans:

spoopyscience:

thisiswhyredismyfavoritecolor:

spoopyscience:

[[[withholds urge to scientifically correct this post]]]

You’re more than welcome to scientifically correct this post. If any of you see me post scientifically incorrect statements, I’d prefer if you called me out on it so I can learn from it, remove the post and do better next time.

Right. Let’s get a thing straight first. Chemical refers to any substance. While it especially refers to ones which are artificially prepared/purified/distilled etc. it is not exclusive to these. If you point at any substance both in the chemistry lab and in the real world it’s going to be a chemical (or numerous chemicals). 
The mantra to get out of that is; Everything is chemicals. 
Therefore oxygen is a chemical, urea is a chemical, vitamin A is a chemical, you’re made of chemicals, everything’s a bloody chemical. So using ‘chemical’ as a scare word is wrong from the get-go. 
here’s a text post that came up on my dash yesterday about the ‘no chemicals’ trope 
Now, using ‘chemical’ as a scare word is nothing new. Anti-vaxxers, new-age hippies, health-food-store-frequenting-pseudo-scientific-vegans have been using it as a scare word for like forever. And it’s worth considering that it’s a) largely an advertising  thing and b) scientifically false. 
I’m going to quickly talk about chemical names as a scare word; Sodium Chloride sounds scary. Like If you saw ‘sodium chloride’ on the back of a packet of oatcakes or can of soup you’d probably feel uneasy because it sounds like something synthesised in a lab which you shouldn’t be eating. However, sodium chloride is just table salt. That’s all it is. So it’s worth thinking to yourself when you see a chemical name on the back of packet ‘what could this be really?’ Ascorbic acid is a pretty common one which usually makes people uneasy, but in all actuality is (one form of) vitamin C. (A- meaning without, scorbic meaning scurvy) 
While i’m here i should also say that counting calories is a pretty shit way of dieting, but that’s another story. 
Something about the delivery of this post makes me uneasy. Almost as if the creator of the image was shaming dieters to forward their anti-chemical agenda. 
[Aside; Chemical can be used as a warning in itself. Like, if i go into a lab and I see a box labeled ‘Danger; Chemicals’ I know the sort of properties I can expect from this chemical, (corrosive, probably an acid, do not handle with bare hands, stuff like that) bc that warning is used (mainly in shipping, i think, that’s what i’ve seen in the UK) to denote dangerous chemicals.  but these sort of warnings are usually only used outside chemistry; a label which says ‘chemicals’ in a chemistry lab is pretty redundant, considering everything is chemicals.]
ther was a cool post going around last month that treated  fruit and vegetables as if they were edible products that needed all their chemicals in them listed, and it really blew out of the water the whole ‘chemicals are scary’ trope
lemme have a search for it

right i’ve only found one
note how there’s also E numbers in the strawberry break down, 
E numbers are merely a shorthand to different chemicals, as ‘E161g’ is shorter and easier to fit on the back of a package than ‘Canthaxanthin’ (which is a chemical used to colour things found in edible mushrooms and fish and some other things too i think

right, that’s all i got

TL;DR ‘Chemicals’ is wrong to use as a scare word, counting chemicals is a useless endeavor, counting calories is also mostly useless, you are made of chemicals, everything is made of chemicals, please stop saying that you want ‘chemical free’ or ‘low in chemicals’ food, 

i think that about covers it, if there’s anything you want further explained then you’re 100% free to ask

scienceshenanigans:

spoopyscience:

thisiswhyredismyfavoritecolor:

spoopyscience:

[[[withholds urge to scientifically correct this post]]]

You’re more than welcome to scientifically correct this post. If any of you see me post scientifically incorrect statements, I’d prefer if you called me out on it so I can learn from it, remove the post and do better next time.

Right. Let’s get a thing straight first. Chemical refers to any substance. While it especially refers to ones which are artificially prepared/purified/distilled etc. it is not exclusive to these. If you point at any substance both in the chemistry lab and in the real world it’s going to be a chemical (or numerous chemicals). 

The mantra to get out of that is; Everything is chemicals. 

Therefore oxygen is a chemical, urea is a chemical, vitamin A is a chemical, you’re made of chemicals, everything’s a bloody chemical. So using ‘chemical’ as a scare word is wrong from the get-go. 

here’s a text post that came up on my dash yesterday about the ‘no chemicals’ trope 

Now, using ‘chemical’ as a scare word is nothing new. Anti-vaxxers, new-age hippies, health-food-store-frequenting-pseudo-scientific-vegans have been using it as a scare word for like forever. And it’s worth considering that it’s a) largely an advertising  thing and b) scientifically false. 

I’m going to quickly talk about chemical names as a scare word; Sodium Chloride sounds scary. Like If you saw ‘sodium chloride’ on the back of a packet of oatcakes or can of soup you’d probably feel uneasy because it sounds like something synthesised in a lab which you shouldn’t be eating. However, sodium chloride is just table salt. That’s all it is. So it’s worth thinking to yourself when you see a chemical name on the back of packet ‘what could this be really?’ Ascorbic acid is a pretty common one which usually makes people uneasy, but in all actuality is (one form of) vitamin C. (A- meaning without, scorbic meaning scurvy) 

While i’m here i should also say that counting calories is a pretty shit way of dieting, but that’s another story. 

Something about the delivery of this post makes me uneasy. Almost as if the creator of the image was shaming dieters to forward their anti-chemical agenda. 

[Aside; Chemical can be used as a warning in itself. Like, if i go into a lab and I see a box labeled ‘Danger; Chemicals’ I know the sort of properties I can expect from this chemical, (corrosive, probably an acid, do not handle with bare hands, stuff like that) bc that warning is used (mainly in shipping, i think, that’s what i’ve seen in the UK) to denote dangerous chemicals.  but these sort of warnings are usually only used outside chemistry; a label which says ‘chemicals’ in a chemistry lab is pretty redundant, considering everything is chemicals.]

ther was a cool post going around last month that treated  fruit and vegetables as if they were edible products that needed all their chemicals in them listed, and it really blew out of the water the whole ‘chemicals are scary’ trope

lemme have a search for it

image

right i’ve only found one

note how there’s also E numbers in the strawberry break down, 

E numbers are merely a shorthand to different chemicals, as ‘E161g’ is shorter and easier to fit on the back of a package than ‘Canthaxanthin’ (which is a chemical used to colour things found in edible mushrooms and fish and some other things too i think
right, that’s all i got
TL;DR ‘Chemicals’ is wrong to use as a scare word, counting chemicals is a useless endeavor, counting calories is also mostly useless, you are made of chemicals, everything is made of chemicals, please stop saying that you want ‘chemical free’ or ‘low in chemicals’ food, 
i think that about covers it, if there’s anything you want further explained then you’re 100% free to ask

image

(via thehealthjourney)

394 notes

beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood:

Raw Nori vegetable wraps with avocados, parsley, peppers, carrots and hummus…RECIPE

(via skinny-healthy-confident)

2,635 notes

(via ambitionperfection)

519 notes

vegan-recipes-for-me:

FALL SWEET POTATO AND KALE SUSHI
INGREDIENTS
-3/4 cup short grain brown rice
-1 Tbsp. rice wine vinegar + dash of salt
-1 1/2 Tbsp. olive oil
-7 cloves garlic, sliced
-1 jumbo bunch of kale, chopped
-1 Tbsp. soy sauce, or to taste
-1 medium sweet potato, diced and steamed in a steamer basket for 10 minutes, or until soft
-3 scallions, diced
-1 avocado, diced
-6-8 seaweed nori sushi sheets
-Handful of walnuts, optional
-Soy sauce with wasabi powder
INSTRUCTIONS
Bring 1 1/2 cups of water and rice to a boil. Add rice wine vinegar and a dash of salt, cover, and reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for 45 minutes, or until rice is soft and sticky.
Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet. Saute garlic for 2 minutes, and then add 1/2 the kale. Use tongs to help it wilt, and then add the remaining kale to the pan. Saute 6-8 minutes, stirring frequently, or until kale is tender, adding soy sauce half way. Depending on how large of a bunch of kale you have, you may need to adjust the soy sauce seasoning, to taste.
When rice is finished, let cool until warm to the touch. Using a large cutting board or flat clean surface, lay out a nori sheet. (Place on top of sushi mat, if using, lining up the long edge of the sheet with the edge closest to you.) Fill a large bowl with water and set nearby.
Spread a thin, 3/4-inch wide layer of rice across nori sheet, lengthwise, leaving 1-inch border on side farthest from you. Add a single layer of sweet potato cubes, followed by a line of kale, sprinkle of scallions and avocado. Add walnuts, if using.
Grab hold of edge of mat closest to you with your thumbs and use your remaining fingers to hold veggie fillings in place as you fold mat over so that the upper and lower edges of rice meet. (If not using a mat, just gently roll with your hands, giving a good press along the roll as you make the first seal.) Give the rolled mat a gentle squeeze, open the mat, and then continue rolling. Dampen fingertips and seal the outer edge of nori sheet to the roll.
Place roll, seam side down, onto a cutting board. Using a sharp knife, roll in half. Cut each half in half. Finish by making a cut down the center of each individual piece of the roll. (It can help to wet the knife as you do this.)
Add wasabi powder to a small dish of soy sauce. Serve.
NOTES

Likely you will have extra kale leftover. Serve as a side and rejoice.

vegan-recipes-for-me:

FALL SWEET POTATO AND KALE SUSHI

INGREDIENTS

  • -3/4 cup short grain brown rice
  • -1 Tbsp. rice wine vinegar + dash of salt
  • -1 1/2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • -7 cloves garlic, sliced
  • -1 jumbo bunch of kale, chopped
  • -1 Tbsp. soy sauce, or to taste
  • -1 medium sweet potato, diced and steamed in a steamer basket for 10 minutes, or until soft
  • -3 scallions, diced
  • -1 avocado, diced
  • -6-8 seaweed nori sushi sheets
  • -Handful of walnuts, optional
  • -Soy sauce with wasabi powder

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Bring 1 1/2 cups of water and rice to a boil. Add rice wine vinegar and a dash of salt, cover, and reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for 45 minutes, or until rice is soft and sticky.
  2. Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet. Saute garlic for 2 minutes, and then add 1/2 the kale. Use tongs to help it wilt, and then add the remaining kale to the pan. Saute 6-8 minutes, stirring frequently, or until kale is tender, adding soy sauce half way. Depending on how large of a bunch of kale you have, you may need to adjust the soy sauce seasoning, to taste.
  3. When rice is finished, let cool until warm to the touch. Using a large cutting board or flat clean surface, lay out a nori sheet. (Place on top of sushi mat, if using, lining up the long edge of the sheet with the edge closest to you.) Fill a large bowl with water and set nearby.
  4. Spread a thin, 3/4-inch wide layer of rice across nori sheet, lengthwise, leaving 1-inch border on side farthest from you. Add a single layer of sweet potato cubes, followed by a line of kale, sprinkle of scallions and avocado. Add walnuts, if using.
  5. Grab hold of edge of mat closest to you with your thumbs and use your remaining fingers to hold veggie fillings in place as you fold mat over so that the upper and lower edges of rice meet. (If not using a mat, just gently roll with your hands, giving a good press along the roll as you make the first seal.) Give the rolled mat a gentle squeeze, open the mat, and then continue rolling. Dampen fingertips and seal the outer edge of nori sheet to the roll.
  6. Place roll, seam side down, onto a cutting board. Using a sharp knife, roll in half. Cut each half in half. Finish by making a cut down the center of each individual piece of the roll. (It can help to wet the knife as you do this.)
  7. Add wasabi powder to a small dish of soy sauce. Serve.

NOTES

Likely you will have extra kale leftover. Serve as a side and rejoice.

(via green-tea-smiles)

287 notes

renniesane:

ULTIMATE GRANOLA GUIDE
Because granola is a must have, and is super healthy.
MAIN INGREDIENTS
1) 3 Cups of oatmeal
Oatmeal is the absolute main ingredient in any granola recipe
2) 1 Cup of nuts
Almonds
Cashews
Walnuts
Peanuts
Pistachios 
Brazil Nuts
Macadamia Nuts
Pecans

3)  2/3 or more cups sweetener

Honey
Agave
Maple Syrup
Brown Rice Syrup
Liquid Stevia


4) 1 tsp salt

Kosher salt
Regular table salt
Sea salt
Himalayan Salt


SUB INGREDIENTS


1) 2/3 to 1 Cup seeds

Pumpkin
Sunflower
Flax
Chia
Millet
Quinoa
Sesame 
2) 4-6 tablespoons Flavor Boosters
Strawberry Jam
Apricot Jam
Fig Jam
Cherry Jam
Peanut butter
Almond Butter
Cashew Butter
Coconut Butter
Coconut flakes and shreds
Cocoa powder
3) 1 teaspoon Spices 
Cinnamon 
Cardamom
Ginger
Nutmeg 
Chili powder

TO ADD AFTER BAKING
1) 1 cup Dried Fruit
dried figs
banana chips
dried apricots
Raisins 
Dried berries
Craisins
Dates
2) Sweet and Savory
These can be added before baking as well, they will melt and become chewy
Chocolate shreds or chips
Peanut butter chips
Puffed rice
homemade Marshmallows  
HOW TO MAKE IT
—> Mix oats, nuts, seed, salt, spices (basically all dry ingredients) in a bowl
—> Add in the sweetener, and (optional) 4 tablespoons of oil, and nut butters/jam/whatever else you’re using
—>Stir well, then spread into a DEEP baking sheet
—> Bake at 300F for 45-50 minutes, stir at 30 minutes
—> Stop when granola looks toasty and smells good - it WILL NOT be crunchy/hard at first
—> Let it cool and harden completely then store in an airtight container (jar)
—> ENJOY! x
Renniesane / Tumblr 

renniesane:

ULTIMATE GRANOLA GUIDE

Because granola is a must have, and is super healthy.

MAIN INGREDIENTS

1) 3 Cups of oatmeal

Oatmeal is the absolute main ingredient in any granola recipe

2) 1 Cup of nuts

  • Almonds
  • Cashews
  • Walnuts
  • Peanuts
  • Pistachios 
  • Brazil Nuts
  • Macadamia Nuts
  • Pecans
3)  2/3 or more cups sweetener
  • Honey
  • Agave
  • Maple Syrup
  • Brown Rice Syrup
  • Liquid Stevia
4) 1 tsp salt
  • Kosher salt
  • Regular table salt
  • Sea salt
  • Himalayan Salt
SUB INGREDIENTS
1) 2/3 to 1 Cup seeds
  • Pumpkin
  • Sunflower
  • Flax
  • Chia
  • Millet
  • Quinoa
  • Sesame 

2) 4-6 tablespoons Flavor Boosters

  • Strawberry Jam
  • Apricot Jam
  • Fig Jam
  • Cherry Jam
  • Peanut butter
  • Almond Butter
  • Cashew Butter
  • Coconut Butter
  • Coconut flakes and shreds
  • Cocoa powder

3) 1 teaspoon Spices 

  • Cinnamon 
  • Cardamom
  • Ginger
  • Nutmeg 
  • Chili powder

TO ADD AFTER BAKING

1) 1 cup Dried Fruit

  • dried figs
  • banana chips
  • dried apricots
  • Raisins 
  • Dried berries
  • Craisins
  • Dates

2) Sweet and Savory

These can be added before baking as well, they will melt and become chewy

  • Chocolate shreds or chips
  • Peanut butter chips
  • Puffed rice
  • homemade Marshmallows  

HOW TO MAKE IT

—> Mix oats, nuts, seed, salt, spices (basically all dry ingredients) in a bowl

—> Add in the sweetener, and (optional) 4 tablespoons of oil, and nut butters/jam/whatever else you’re using

—>Stir well, then spread into a DEEP baking sheet

—> Bake at 300F for 45-50 minutes, stir at 30 minutes

—> Stop when granola looks toasty and smells good - it WILL NOT be crunchy/hard at first

—> Let it cool and harden completely then store in an airtight container (jar)

—> ENJOY! x

Renniesane / Tumblr 

(via eat-well-and-go-to-the-gym)

6,133 notes

redefiningfood:

Love Yourself: Healthy (oil-free, no-flour) Vegan Banana Oatmeal Muffins [More from Love Yourself by Jintana W.]

I’d gone to bed last night feeling guilty about not having called my mother, but when I messaged her in the morning she replied with an excited “That’s alright - because I successfully made deliciously healthy oatmeal raisin banana muffins!" Perhaps I should be worried that I stand on par with a batch of banana muffins in my mother’s regard- but the improv cook in me understands the ebullience of redefining a recipe that was never meant to be healthy. People view proponents of healthy food with suspicion, and rightfully so - another innocently sinful dessert has been inducted into the dark cult of oil-free, wholesomely delicious desserts.  

For the recipe, click the Read More. Recipe and pictures by Jintana W.

Read More

760 notes

veganfoody:

Blackberry Hazelnut Crumble Bars (GF)

veganfoody:

Blackberry Hazelnut Crumble Bars (GF)

(via inlovewithhowyoufeel-fit)

366 notes

butfirstbreakfast:

Raw Green Detox Juices
Green Veggie Juice
serves 2-3
1 cucumber
5 celery stalks
100g broccoli
1/4 fennel bulb
1/2 courgette
1 apple
1 lime, peeled
3 large handfuls of fresh parsley
3 large handfuls spinach/kale
Alternate leaves with celery and apple to prevent getting caught in machine. Divide the juice between 2-3 glasses and serve.
Apple, fennel & broccoli juice
Serves 2
4 large apples
200g broccoli
1 large fennel bulb
1 lemon, peeled
Put all the ingredients in a juicer and blitz until all the juice is extracted. Divide the juice between 2 glasses and serve immediately.
Pineapple & apple juice with spinach
Serves 2
5 apples
2 handfuls of spinach
1 handful of fresh mint
1/2 large pineapple, peeled
1 lime, peeled
Put 1 apple in the chute of the juicer, followed by the spinach, mint and a piece of pineapple. Turn the juicer on and push through. Follow with the remaining ingredients. Divide the juice between 2 glasses and serve lightly chilled.
Cucumber, apple & pear juice with watercress
Serves 2
3 apples
2 handfuls of watercress
1 large cucumber
2 pears
1 lemon, peeled
Place 1 apple in the chute of the juicer, followed by the watercress. Turn the juicer on and push through. Follow with another apple and then remaining ingredients. Divide the juice between 2 glasses and serve lightly chilled.
Mint lemonade
Serves 2
freshly squeezed juice of 1 lime
freshly squeezed juice of 1 lemon
400ml water
1-2 tbsp agave nectar
1 handful fresh mint
Put all the ingredient in a blender and blitz until completely smooth. Strain the lemonade through a sieve/strainer and divide between 2 glasses. Serve lightly chilled.

butfirstbreakfast:

Raw Green Detox Juices

Green Veggie Juice

serves 2-3

  • 1 cucumber
  • 5 celery stalks
  • 100g broccoli
  • 1/4 fennel bulb
  • 1/2 courgette
  • 1 apple
  • 1 lime, peeled
  • 3 large handfuls of fresh parsley
  • 3 large handfuls spinach/kale

Alternate leaves with celery and apple to prevent getting caught in machine. Divide the juice between 2-3 glasses and serve.

Apple, fennel & broccoli juice

Serves 2

  • 4 large apples
  • 200g broccoli
  • 1 large fennel bulb
  • 1 lemon, peeled

Put all the ingredients in a juicer and blitz until all the juice is extracted. Divide the juice between 2 glasses and serve immediately.

Pineapple & apple juice with spinach

Serves 2

  • 5 apples
  • 2 handfuls of spinach
  • 1 handful of fresh mint
  • 1/2 large pineapple, peeled
  • 1 lime, peeled

Put 1 apple in the chute of the juicer, followed by the spinach, mint and a piece of pineapple. Turn the juicer on and push through. Follow with the remaining ingredients. Divide the juice between 2 glasses and serve lightly chilled.

Cucumber, apple & pear juice with watercress

Serves 2

  • 3 apples
  • 2 handfuls of watercress
  • 1 large cucumber
  • 2 pears
  • 1 lemon, peeled

Place 1 apple in the chute of the juicer, followed by the watercress. Turn the juicer on and push through. Follow with another apple and then remaining ingredients. Divide the juice between 2 glasses and serve lightly chilled.

Mint lemonade

Serves 2

  • freshly squeezed juice of 1 lime
  • freshly squeezed juice of 1 lemon
  • 400ml water
  • 1-2 tbsp agave nectar
  • 1 handful fresh mint

Put all the ingredient in a blender and blitz until completely smooth. Strain the lemonade through a sieve/strainer and divide between 2 glasses. Serve lightly chilled.

(via dateswithweights)

128 notes

butfirstbreakfast:

Parsnip “Rice” Salad with Capers & Tomatoes
For a delightful change from real rice, try this medley of earthly parsnip, juicy tomatoes and sharp, salty capers.
serves 3-4
2 parsnips, peeled and roughly chopped
150g cherry tomatoes, halved
2 tbsp capers, rinsed and drained
1 courgette, diced
2 big handfuls rocket
Balsamic vinaigrette
salt and pepper
Put the parsnips in a food processor and pulse briefly a few times until they are finely chopped like rice. Transfer to a bowl and add the tomatoes, capers and courgette. Stir well.
Add the rocket and gently toss, then stir through enough Balsamic vinaigrette to coat. Season to taste.
Balsamic Vinaigrette
Balsamic vinegar is an Italian vinegar made from white Trebbiano grapes, which are particularly sweet. It is fermented and aged in wooden barrels over a number of years to produce a distinctively mellow dark vinegar that gives a rich sweetness to salad dressings.
makes about 250ml
120ml olive oil
60ml balsamic vinegar
1 tbsp soy sauce
1.5 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1.5 tbsp maple syrup
Put all the ingredients in a screw-top jar and shake well until emulsified. Shake or stir again before serving.

butfirstbreakfast:

Parsnip “Rice” Salad with Capers & Tomatoes

For a delightful change from real rice, try this medley of earthly parsnip, juicy tomatoes and sharp, salty capers.

serves 3-4

  • 2 parsnips, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 150g cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 2 tbsp capers, rinsed and drained
  • 1 courgette, diced
  • 2 big handfuls rocket
  • Balsamic vinaigrette
  • salt and pepper

Put the parsnips in a food processor and pulse briefly a few times until they are finely chopped like rice. Transfer to a bowl and add the tomatoes, capers and courgette. Stir well.

Add the rocket and gently toss, then stir through enough Balsamic vinaigrette to coat. Season to taste.

Balsamic Vinaigrette

Balsamic vinegar is an Italian vinegar made from white Trebbiano grapes, which are particularly sweet. It is fermented and aged in wooden barrels over a number of years to produce a distinctively mellow dark vinegar that gives a rich sweetness to salad dressings.

makes about 250ml

  • 120ml olive oil
  • 60ml balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1.5 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1.5 tbsp maple syrup

Put all the ingredients in a screw-top jar and shake well until emulsified. Shake or stir again before serving.

46 notes

butfirstbreakfast:

Mock Tuna Salad with Olives
This is a clever vegan answer to tuna cravings and full of appealing textures and colours.
serves 4
watercress or rocket to serve
salt and pepper
(for the mock tuna)
120g walnuts
120g sunflower seeds
1 celery stalk finely chopped
1 carrot, peeled and grated
1 handful fresh dill, chopped
(for the tomato mayo sauce)
75g cashew nuts
3 tbsp water
1 tomato, chopped
1/4 red onion, chopped
1 garlic clove, peeled and chopped
2 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tbsp natural yeast (optional)
1 tsp agave nectar
1 tsp mustard powder
(for the topping)
1 courgette, finely diced
1 cucumber, finely diced
2 large tomatoes, diced
100g pitted black olives
1 handful fresh parsley, chopped
3 tbsp olive oil
Soak the walnuts and sunflower seeds for the mock tuna in a bowl of cold water, and the cashews for the tomato mayo sauce in a separate bowl of cold water for 30 minutes.
For the mock tuna, thoroughly drain the walnuts and seeds and place them in a food processor. Blitz them to a smooth paste, adding a little water if necessary. Transfer to a bowl and add the celery, carrot and dill. Mix well, season to taste and set aside.
For the tomato mayo sauce, thoroughly drain the cashews and put in a blender or food processor with the remaining ingredients. Blend until completely smooth and runny, adding a little water if necessary. Transfer to the mock tuna and stir well. Season to taste.
For the topping, combine all the ingredients and season to taste.
To serve, place the mock tuna on a bed of watercress or rocket and scatter the topping over everything.

butfirstbreakfast:

Mock Tuna Salad with Olives

This is a clever vegan answer to tuna cravings and full of appealing textures and colours.

serves 4

  • watercress or rocket to serve
  • salt and pepper

(for the mock tuna)

  • 120g walnuts
  • 120g sunflower seeds
  • 1 celery stalk finely chopped
  • 1 carrot, peeled and grated
  • 1 handful fresh dill, chopped

(for the tomato mayo sauce)

  • 75g cashew nuts
  • 3 tbsp water
  • 1 tomato, chopped
  • 1/4 red onion, chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and chopped
  • 2 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp natural yeast (optional)
  • 1 tsp agave nectar
  • 1 tsp mustard powder

(for the topping)

  • 1 courgette, finely diced
  • 1 cucumber, finely diced
  • 2 large tomatoes, diced
  • 100g pitted black olives
  • 1 handful fresh parsley, chopped
  • 3 tbsp olive oil

Soak the walnuts and sunflower seeds for the mock tuna in a bowl of cold water, and the cashews for the tomato mayo sauce in a separate bowl of cold water for 30 minutes.

For the mock tuna, thoroughly drain the walnuts and seeds and place them in a food processor. Blitz them to a smooth paste, adding a little water if necessary. Transfer to a bowl and add the celery, carrot and dill. Mix well, season to taste and set aside.

For the tomato mayo sauce, thoroughly drain the cashews and put in a blender or food processor with the remaining ingredients. Blend until completely smooth and runny, adding a little water if necessary. Transfer to the mock tuna and stir well. Season to taste.

For the topping, combine all the ingredients and season to taste.

To serve, place the mock tuna on a bed of watercress or rocket and scatter the topping over everything.

13 notes